Hi tricia wang!
#ellethedog has been posting a lot of pics of her day job on her own Instagram account @ellethedog_  (at Secret Clubhouse)

#ellethedog has been posting a lot of pics of her day job on her own Instagram account @ellethedog_ (at Secret Clubhouse)

Man on bus with lots of flowers. Something about him made me think he is a dancer. #brooklyn  (at Barclays Center)

Man on bus with lots of flowers. Something about him made me think he is a dancer. #brooklyn (at Barclays Center)

I met a woman with verrrrrrrry long nails on the subway today. I 💗NYC.

I met a woman with verrrrrrrry long nails on the subway today. I 💗NYC.

Birthday boy roger! YAV crew / yet another Virgo  (at Parm)

Birthday boy roger! YAV crew / yet another Virgo (at Parm)

Men with diverse fabric tastes are sexy! @shashashasha @mttlmy are creating a YouTube series about curating your A+ look.  (at Secret Clubhouse)

Men with diverse fabric tastes are sexy! @shashashasha @mttlmy are creating a YouTube series about curating your A+ look. (at Secret Clubhouse)

Ok @ellethedog_ finally has her own Instagram account. She has thousands of photos under #ellethedog so it will take a long time to transfer her photos over!

Ok @ellethedog_ finally has her own Instagram account. She has thousands of photos under #ellethedog so it will take a long time to transfer her photos over!

From data log analysis, the [Financial Times] learned that staggering numbers of new digital subscribers didn’t register for free before they [began] paying for a subscription — they came to our digital products with little or no apparent digital footprint and went straight into a purchase. “This insight destroyed the concept of a traditional, linear ‘sales funnel,’” says Betts.

Ken Doctor, The newsonomics of “Little Data,” data scientists, and conversion specialists

This surprising anecdote comes from a meaty article about how news companies are hiring data scientists to better understand the behaviour of customers. Those insights are used to inform everything from marketing to developing new media products.

I wish the source had gone on to propose a hypothesis for this behaviour.

Does it simply mean that FT is doing a bad job of upselling, or does it reveal something about what motivates people to pay for a digital subscription?

(via quartey)

Two ideas:

- If you’re a person who thinks “I am the sort of person who reads the FT regularly” you might well also be the sort of person who thinks “I am the sort of person who can easily afford an FT subscription” - for prestige/social capital goods the psychological appeal of ‘free’ might clash with a kind of status appeal.

- Getting free stuff feels good. But buying part of a thing instead of the whole thing feels bad - especially if you want the whole thing. I would bet there are an awful lot of Angry Birds players who never bothered with the free app even though they didn’t know yet whether they liked the game.

(via blackbeardblog)

Yup, that feels right.

It reminds me of an anecdote about beer prices (scroll down to the “Offering 3 Options” section) that’s apparently in W. Poundstone’s Priceless. The take-away is “Some people will always buy the most expensive option, no matter the price.”

(via quartey)

As Tricia puts it: there is no standard model of conversion. There are multiple behaviors that fall along a distribution particular to the culture of your platform. Listen for those behaviors and then design services around all of them.

(via kenyatta)

(via kenyatta)

Let’s say it’s a vocal minority that’s not representative of most people. Most people, from indies to industry leaders, are mortified, furious, disheartened at the direction industry conversation has taken in the past few weeks. It’s not like there are reputable outlets publishing rational articles in favor of the trolls’ ‘side’. Don’t give press to the harassers. Don’t blame an entire industry for a few bad apples.

Yet disclaiming liability is clearly no help. Game websites with huge community hubs whose fans are often associated with blunt Twitter hate mobs sort of shrug, they say things like ‘we delete the really bad stuff, what else can we do’ and ‘those people don’t represent our community’ — but actually, those people do represent your community. That’s what your community is known for, whether you like it or not.

When you decline to create or to curate a culture in your spaces, you’re responsible for what spawns in the vacuum. That’s what’s been happening to games.
Gamasutra - ‘Gamers’ don’t have to be your audience. ‘Gamers’ are over. (via kenyatta)

(via kenyatta)

[Algorithms and heuristics] are very important in cybernetics, for in dealing with unthinkable systems it is normally impossible to give a full specification of a goal, and therefore impossible to prescribe an algorithm. But it is not usually too difficult to prescribe a class of goals, so that moving in some general description will leave you better off (by some definite criterion) than you were before. To think in terms of heuristics rather than algorithms is at once a way of coping with proliferating variety. Instead of trying to organize it in full detail, you organize it only somewhat; you then ride on the dynamics of the system in the direction you want to go.

These two techniques for organizing control in a system of proliferating variety are really rather dissimilar. The strange thing is that we tend to live our lives by heuristics, and to try and control them by algorithms. Our general endeavor is to survive, yet we specify in detail (‘catch the 8:45 train’, ‘ask for a raise’) how to get to this unspecified and unspecifiable goal. We certainly need these algorithms, in order to live coherently; but we also need heuristics — and we are rarely conscious of them. This is because our education is planned around detailed analysis: we do not (we learn) really understand things unless we can specify their infrastructure. The point came up before in the discussion of transfer functions, and now it comes up again in connection with goals. […] Birds evolved from reptiles, it seems. Did a representative body of lizards pass a resolution to learn to fly? If so, by what means could the lizards have organized their genetic variety to grow wings? One has only to say such things to recognize them as ridiculous — but the birds are flying this evening outside my window. This is because heuristics work while we are still sucking the pencil which would like to prescribe an algorithm.

Stafford Beer, “Brain of the Firm,” 1972. 

1972, folks. “This is because heuristics work while we are still sucking the pencil which would like to prescribe an algorithm.”

(via slavin)

One for would-be CompSci students.

(via mistersaxon)

(via kenyatta)

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